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Abstract Presented at the 26th Annual Meeting of the Arthroscopy Association of North America| Volume 23, ISSUE 6, SUPPLEMENT , e10, June 2007

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Arthroscopic Bursectomy for Recalcitrant Trochanteric Bursitis (SS-18)

      Summary

      We evaluated the results of arthroscopic treatment for patients with chronic recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis who had not responded to nonoperative interventions. Arthroscopic bursectomy appears to be effective and a viable alternative to open bursectomy in these patients. In this prospective study, patients experienced good pain relief and improved function after surgery. Patients’ improvements were usually evident by 1 to 3 months after surgery and appear to be lasting because patients maintained their improved scores throughout the follow-up period.

      Methods

      Thirty patients were enrolled in this prospective study to evaluate the results of arthroscopic bursectomy. Outcomes were assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Harris Hip Score, visual analog pain (VAS) scale, and additional specific hip function questions. Five patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five patients were available for follow up at an average of 26.1 months (range, 13.8-41 months).

      Results

      Improvements were noted in the physical and mental component summary scores of the SF-36. Mean physical function preoperative score improved from 33.6 preoperatively to 54 at last follow up, and in the pain category, the mean score improved from 28.7 to 51.5. Mean Harris Hip scores improved from a preoperative score of 51 to a follow-up score of 77. VAS pain scale scores also improved from the preoperative mean of 7.2 (0 = no pain; 10 = worst pain) to 3.1. One postoperative complication occurred, a seroma that required repeat surgery. One patient subsequently underwent open bursectomy with resolution of symptoms.

      Conclusions

      Arthroscopic bursectomy appears to be effective and a viable alternative to open bursectomy for patients who do not respond to nonoperative treatment. In this prospective study, patients experienced good pain relief and improved function after surgery. Patients’ improvements were usually evident by 1 to 3 months after surgery and appear to be lasting because patients maintained their improved scores throughout the follow-up period.