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Is Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope Correlated With Clinical Outcomes of Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation?

      Purpose

      To investigate (1) the correlation between lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) and clinical outcomes of lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) and (2) the difference of lateral PTS between the extrusion and nonextrusion groups or between the failure and nonfailure groups in lateral MAT.

      Methods

      Between January 2001 and February 2016, we retrospectively evaluated 61 patients (mean age, 29.1 ± 12.2 years) who underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were followed for a minimum of 2 years after primary lateral MAT. The lateral PTS and graft extrusion in the coronal and sagittal planes were assessed by using MRI performed at 1 year postoperatively. Clinical scores and graft failure were evaluated at the last follow-up visit. The correlation between lateral PTS and clinical outcomes (clinical scores, graft extrusion) was analyzed. Lateral PTS was compared between the extrusion and nonextrusion groups and between the failure and nonfailure groups.

      Results

      Mean lateral PTS on MRI was 6.6° ± 3.1° (range, 0.8° to 15.7°). A significant correlation was not identified between lateral PTS and clinical outcomes (clinical scores, graft extrusion in the coronal and sagittal planes). A significant difference in lateral PTS was not identified between the extrusion and nonextrusion groups in the coronal (6.2° ± 2.5° vs 7.0° ± 3.4°, P = .400) and sagittal (anterior horn, 6.5° ± 2.3° vs 6.7° ± 3.7°, P = .988; posterior horn, 6.8° ± 3.5° vs 6.5° ± 2.7°, P = .771) planes. Moreover, a significant difference was not identified between the failure and nonfailure groups (7.5° ± 3.3° vs 6.4° ± 3.0°, P = .388).

      Conclusions

      A significant correlation between lateral PTS and clinical or radiologic outcomes of lateral MAT was not identified.

      Level of Evidence

      Level IV, therapeutic case series with subgroup analysis.
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