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Comment on: “The Influence of Bone Loss on Glenoid Version Measurement: A Computer-Modeled Cadaveric Analysis”

      We read the article, “The Influence of the Bone Loss on Glenoid Version Measurement: A Computer-Modeled Cadaveric Analysis” by J. W. Griffin et al.
      • Griffin J.W.
      • Collins M.
      • Leroux T.S.
      • et al.
      The influence of bone loss on glenoid version measurement: A computer-modeled cadaveric analysis.
      with great pleasure. We are currently conducting a study on glenoid morphology. The literature demonstrates the importance of the natural replacement of glenoid morphology and its implications in practice in instability and joint replacement surgeries.
      • Piponov H.I.
      • Savin D.
      • Shah N.
      • et al.
      Glenoid version and size: does gender, ethnicity, or body size play a role?.
      • Kircher J.
      • Wiedemann M.
      • Magosch P.
      • Lichtenberg S.
      • Habermeyer P.
      Improved accuracy of glenoid positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty with intraoperative navigation: A prospective-randomized clinical study.
      The technique described by Friedman is still used in our day in glenoid version measurements. In this technique the position of the joint line, with respect to the line of neutral version defined regarding the scapular axis, is defined as anteversion or retroversion.
      • Friedman R.J.
      • Hawthorne K.B.
      • Genez B.M.
      The use of computerized tomography in the measurement of glenoid version.
      The effect of the anterior and posterior glenoid defects, created on a computer using this technique, on the version has been investigated in the above-mentioned study. It was reported in the study that all specimens were retroverted and that the anterior defects decreased this angle of retroversion, whereas the posterior defects had an opposite effect, as stated in the Results section. Despite the usage of the term “version” for reflection of the glenoid defect in the measurements in Table 1, the authors used the wording “decreased anteversion” instead of the term “version” in the paragraph that talks about anterior instability, under the Discussion section. In anterior glenoid defects, retroversion decreases, not anteversion. On the contrary, anteversion increases. We wanted to highlight that this expression may cause misunderstandings.

      Supplementary Data

      References

        • Griffin J.W.
        • Collins M.
        • Leroux T.S.
        • et al.
        The influence of bone loss on glenoid version measurement: A computer-modeled cadaveric analysis.
        Arthroscopy. 2018; 34: 2319-2323
        • Piponov H.I.
        • Savin D.
        • Shah N.
        • et al.
        Glenoid version and size: does gender, ethnicity, or body size play a role?.
        Int Orthop. 2016; 40: 2347-2353
        • Kircher J.
        • Wiedemann M.
        • Magosch P.
        • Lichtenberg S.
        • Habermeyer P.
        Improved accuracy of glenoid positioning in total shoulder arthroplasty with intraoperative navigation: A prospective-randomized clinical study.
        J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2009; 18: 515-520
        • Friedman R.J.
        • Hawthorne K.B.
        • Genez B.M.
        The use of computerized tomography in the measurement of glenoid version.
        J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1992; 74: 1032-1037