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A Glenoid Defect of 13.5% or Larger Is Not Always Critical in Male Competitive Rugby and American Football Players Undergoing Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Repair: Contribution of Resultant Large Bone Fragment

      Purpose

      To investigate bone union and postoperative recurrence after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair (ABBR) in male competitive rugby and American football players with a subcritical glenoid defect of ≥13.5% and to compare findings with those in players with a glenoid defect of <13.5%.

      Methods

      Participants were male competitive rugby or American football players with a glenoid defect and bone fragment who underwent ABBR from July 2011 to December 2018 and were followed for a minimum of 2 years. We investigated the influence of glenoid defect and bone fragment size on bone union and postoperative recurrence after ABBR.

      Results

      We included 45 rugby players and 35 American football players. A total of 38 shoulders were assigned to the small defect group (<13.5%) and 42 to the large defect group (≥13.5%). The complete bone union rate was 47.4% in the small defect group and 71.4% in the large defect group (P = .040), and postoperative recurrence was seen in 13 (34.2%) and 5 shoulders (11.9%), respectively (P = .030). In the small defect group, the bone fragment size was <7.5% in 30 shoulders and ≥7.5% in 8 shoulders; in comparison, the respective numbers were 12 and 30 shoulders in the large defect group, and large fragments (>7.5%) were significantly more common in this group (P < .001). The complete union rate was significantly higher in shoulders with a large fragment (≥7.5%) than in those with a small fragment (<7.5%; 78.9% versus 42.9%, respectively; P = .001). The recurrence rate was 33.3% in shoulders with a small fragment (<7.5%) and 10.5% in shoulders with a large fragment (≥7.5%; P = .017) and was significantly lower in shoulders with a complete union than in those without a complete union (6.3% versus 46.9%, respectively; P < .001).

      Conclusion

      The postoperative recurrence rate after ABBR was lower in male competitive rugby and American football players with a large glenoid defect (≥13.5%) than in those with a small glenoid defect (<13.5%) and might be associated with a higher rate of complete bone union of the resultant large bone fragment (≥7.5%).

      Level of evidence

      III, case-control study.
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