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The effect of radiofrequency energy on the length and temperature properties of the glenohumeral joint capsule

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      Abstract

      The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency energy on the length and temperature properties of the glenohumeral joint capsule in a sheep model. Dissected glenohumeral joint capsules were placed in a 37 degrees C tissue bath and treated with radiofrequency energy at temperature settings of 60 degrees, 65 degrees, 70 degrees, 75 degrees and 80 degrees C. Pretreatment and posttreatment tissue length was measured, and tissue temperature changes were recorded at distances of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 mm away from the probe path. Tissue shrinkage was found to be less than 4% for treatments below 65 degrees C, and increased to 14% for treatments at 80 degrees C. Posttreatment lengths of tissues treated at 65 degrees, 70 degrees, 75 degrees, 80 degrees C were significantly shorter than pretreatment lengths. The maximum tissue temperatures directly below the probe were observed to be 3.7 degrees to 6.7 degrees C lower than the set temperatures. As the distance from the probe was increased, the tissue temperature was found to decrease, reaching a value of less than 45 degrees C at 1.5 mm for all five treatment temperature settings. This study provided basic information on temperature settings, tissue shrinkage, and tissue temperature distribution of radiofrequency treatment.
      Arthroscopy 1998 May-Jun;14(4):395-400
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