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The Cyclops Lesion: A Cause of Diminished Knee Extension After Rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

      Abstract

      Summary: Four patients presented with persistent diminution of knee motion after rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament with a novel lesion as the cause. Each had participated in an aggressive rehabilitation program for a minimum of 2 months with emphasis on regaining full range of knee motion. Because chronic impairment of knee extension can be disabling, in those who did not regain full range of motion, arthroscopy of the knee ensued. All had a lesion in the intercondylar notch near the tibial insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament that acted as a mechanical obstruction to full knee extension. Grossly and histologically, these were similar to the cyclops lesion that also has been shown to cause loss of knee extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Arthroscopic debridement of the cyclops lesion and manual manipulation of the knee under anesthesia lead to restoration of full knee extension in all knees. In 1 other knee with chronic instability after anterior cruciate ligament rupture, the cyclops lesion was present but was very small and was not associated with diminished knee extension. When loss of full extension persists for 2 months after anterior cruciate ligament disruption despite aggressive rehabilitation, the presence of a cyclops lesion should be considered.
      Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Vol 15, No 7 (October), 1999: pp 757–761

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